Free Finola Hemp Tea!

We’re celebrating harvest time by giving away a 10g sachet of Mediweed Finola Hemp Tea with all orders.

FInola Premium Tea
Finola Premium Tea

Yes, you heard that right. Free CBD Tea!! Made from top quality hand-picked Finola hemp, grown in th Czech Republic. Our tea is famed for its soothing, pain and stress-relieving effects; one cup of this will ease you into the day and soothe your aches and pains away.

But what’s the catch?

Well, it’s harvest time, and that means that most of the Mediweed team are out in the fields picking. We will try to minimise disruption to deliveries, but if you find your delivery is taking slightly longer than you hoped, please be patient and bare with us. It’s worth the wait!

*Offer applies to all Mediweed orders taken from 26th August – 15th September. Free gift will be 10g Finola Hemp Tea. This may be sent separately to your order*

It’s HARVEST TIME!!

Here on our European farm our crop of fantastic FINOLA is ripe and ready for the picking.

 mediweed finola harvest huge bud
Queen of Queens

After months of loving care, the ladies are finally ready and our team have moved in and started the painstaking process of hand picking.

Traditional Harvesting Methods

Hemp can be harvested in several different ways. Many growers use industrial farming methods, machine chopping the hemp using combine harvestors which sort the stems, heads and seeds mechanically.

Here at Mediweed we feel that our plants are more precious than that, which is why we hand pick our crop, carefully cutting each plant at precisely the right moment, when the tricombes are mature and at peak strength. This ensures that the flower heads are perfectly intact and avoids rough handling.

Premium CBD Flowers and Entourage Creams

The plants are then carefully trimmed, dried and cured in our special drying facilities. They will then be sorted into Premium Grade Buds, High Grade Buds and Standard Grade (unsorted) buds (ideal for extraction purposes)

After which the careful process of producing our Full Spectrum Entourage products, such as our Entourage CBD Atomisers, drops and CBD lip balm begins.

Free Gift with all orders

This is a very labour intensive process and means that for the next few weeks our Mediweed office will be manned by just a skeleton crew. As a consequence, orders may take a little longer to process, but as a thank you for your patience and understanding, we’ll be adding a FREE GIFT sachet of Mediweed Finola Hemp Tea to all orders made during the next month. What better way to relax than with a nice cuppa!

New CBD Products coming soon

Once the harvest is home and dried, we can return to our passion – creating the entourage cremes, salves and oils that you love so much. Look out for fantastic new products coming in September.

More details to follow soon!

Q: What’s fruity, loaded with crystals and coming soon to Mediweed?!

A: Our awesome new TRUE HEMP strain!

Deliciously Fruity True Hemp buds
Rich True Hemp bud with a great cannabinoid balance

Exact details of this new super-strain are still top secret, but we can tell you that it’s an indoor, high grade tropical fruity cross, with dark dense, highly resinous buds, a deep earthy smell and a rich zesty sweet TRUE HEMP flavour with a great cannabinoid balance.

This is an uplifting strain, great for creativity and alertness with a tingly warm body sensation to keep you up and smiling all day long.

It’s a fine addition to the Amnesia, Chronic, Bubalicious and Candy in our True Hemp range and we can’t wait for you to try it.

Can you guess what it is yet?!

Medical cannabis on prescription soon in UK

From The Independent

Medical cannabis to be available on prescription in UK after being approved for use by government

Home secretary says change is ‘in no way a first step to the legalisation of cannabis for recreational use’

 

Medical cannabis will be made available on prescription after it was approved for use by the government.

Doctors will be able to prescribe medicine derived from marijuana“by the autumn” the Home Office announced.

The home secretary, Sajid Javid, said: “Recent cases involving sick children made it clear to me that our position on cannabis-related medicinal products was not satisfactory.

“Following advice from two sets of independent advisors, I have taken the decision to reschedule cannabis-derived medicinal products – meaning they will be available on prescription.

“This will help patients with an exceptional clinical need.”

But Mr Javid said it was “in no way a first step to the legalisation of cannabis for recreational use.”

Possession of the class B drug will still carry an unlimited fine and up to five years in jail, while dealers face 14 years in prison.

It comes after Billy Caldwell, a 12-year-old boy who suffers from a rare form of epilepsy, was granted an emergency licence allowing him to be treated with medical marijuana by Northern Ireland’s Department of Health earlier this month.

Billy had previously been granted a short-term licence by the Home Office to allow him access to cannabis oil, which his mother, Charlotte, says helps to control his seizures.

Ms Caldwell said the rescheduling of medical cannabis was “incredible.” She said: ”For the first time in months I’m almost lost for words, other than ‘thank-you Sajid Javid’.

“That the Home Secretary has announced that medicinal cannabis can now be prescribed by GPs on Billy’s 13th birthday is amazing. I wonder if he knew? Never has Billy received a better birthday present, and never from somebody so unexpected.

An initial review by Dame Sally Davies, chief medical adviser, concluded there is evidence medicinal cannabis has therapeutic benefits.

The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD), which carried out the second part of the review, last week said doctors should be able to prescribe medicinal cannabis provided products meet safety standards.

It recommended Medical cannabis products should be placed in Schedule 2 of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.

Jeremy Corbyn advocates the availability of cannabis for medicinal purposes

Cannabis was previously classed as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning it was thought to have no therapeutic value but can be used for the purposes of research with a Home Office licence.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) will now develop a clear definition of what constitutes a cannabis-derived medicinal product, the Home Office said.

They will then be rescheduled and made available on prescription.

Now legalize recreational cannabis, says UK public

Karen Gray, whose son Murray suffers from epilepsy and has been treated with medical cannabis, said the change represented a victory for those who sought access to the treatment.

She told The Independent: “It’s really going to help children out there, so it’s brilliant news. There are a lot of kids out there who aren’t getting this help and hopefully now they will.”

Ms Gray started a petition which garnered 240,000 signatures to make medicinal cannabis available on the NHS.

Sir Mike Penning, co-chairman of the recently established cross-party parliamentary group on Medical Cannabis Under Prescription, said: “I have just spoken to the home secretary to say how pleased I am that he has acted so quickly and I pay testament to the families and campaigners that have fought so hard to achieve this dramatic change in policy.

“This announcement brings hope to many thousands of people.

“However, there is still a very important body of work to define exactly which products will be allowed and how they will be regulated.”

He added: “Any move to restrict medical cannabis in the UK to a very narrow range of derived products, each requiring full pharmaceutical trials, thereby blocking out the many products available overseas, will lead to great disappointment and be a missed opportunity.”

Before the changes are brought in, clinicians can still apply to the independent expert panel on behalf of patients who want access to medicinal cannabis products.

The Home Secretary said licence fees for applications made to the panel will be waived, and those already granted will not be charged

Genevieve Edwards, director of external affairs at the MS Society, said: “This is exceptional news and we want to thank the home secretary for the speed at which this decision has been made.

“We started campaigning for cannabis for MS exactly a year ago and it’s incredible to see how far we’ve come since then. The priority now has to be making sure everyone who could benefit can access cannabis in a safe and responsible way.

“We plan to work closely with the Government to determine what exactly this will mean for people with MS. This life-changing decision could help thousands with the condition who haven’t been able to find relief for their pain and muscle spasms.”

Cannabidiol And The Benefits Of CBD

cbd science

Scientists are rapidly discovering more and more about the rather amazing CBD benefits found in the cannabis plant. Most of them have shown therapeutic value, as have the terpenes, which give the plant its distinct odors. There are over 125 terpenes and over 80 cannabinoids in cannabis and each strain has its own unique blend that create its distinct effects.

CBD is just one cannabinoid. Cannabinoids are 21-carbon molecules that block or stimulate endocannabinoid receptors. It’s known that other cannabinoids, such as THC, THCV, CBN and CBD, bind to CB1 and/or CB2 receptors, just as do the brain’s own naturally occurring cannabinoids – AEA and 2 AG.

Many of these cannabinoids have therapeutic value and CBD is no exception. It is a non-psychotropic cannabinoid, meaning it does not contribute to the euphoria associated with certain strains of cannabis. It is, however, psychoactive, because it crosses the blood-brain barrier. Unlike THC, CBD can be administered at relatively high doses without undesired psychological side effects.

CBD also has the effect of reducing the undesirable effects of high-THC cannabis, such as anxiety and paranoia, which allows a patient to ingest more THC, which has its own incredible medical effects. CBD is a powerful anti-epileptic, anti-depressant, anti-inflammatory, anti-nauseate, sleep aid, muscle relaxant, sedative and anti-proliferative.

What’s in A Name?

The US federal government seems schizophrenic when it comes to CBD. Some interpret the government’s position to mean CBD is legal if it comes from hemp, despite hemp, cannabis and marijuana all being the exact same thing. We should not be surprised. An odd distinction existed from 1916 until 1942 where what you called the plant made the difference between cannabis being legal and marijuana being illegal.

Marijuana was illegal in most states but cannabis was not only legal in all states, but widely prescribed by physicians and available in over twenty-five over-the-counter medicines. The marijuana laws were more often applied to Hispanics and African Americans while Anglo-Caucasian and other pharmacy cannabis customers could obtain the medicinal cannabis with impunity.

The US federal government has patented CBD. Here is what they say in their patent abstract:

Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia. Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses useful in the method of the present invention. A particular disclosed class of cananbinoids useful as neuroprotective antioxidants is formula (1) wherein the R group is independently selected from the group consisting of H, CH3 and COCH3.

CBD tincture

The big selling point for the surging popularity of CBD has been that it is non-euphoric. The idea that using medication to feel good is not appropriate, unusual or unacceptable seems to almost uniquely apply to cannabis. Tranquilizers, antidepressants and ED medicines are all intended to make us feel emotionally better, even euphoric. While some may not want the euphoria associated with THC and other euphorigenic constituents of the plant, there is the therapeutic consideration of the benefit of using the whole plant (the entourage effect). As with any therapeutic agent the physician will weigh the balance of the therapeutic effects to the side effects.

Many clinicians believe that using CBD as an isolated compound not only diminishes its therapeutic value but does not take full advantage of the medicinal value of cannabis. This is because of the entourage effect, the concept that the totality of the therapeutic constituents of the plant acting together are more effective than any single isolated compound acting alone.

The federal government promotes the concept that “Single-molecule pharmaceuticals are superior to ‘crude’ whole plant medicinals.” Here’s what Martin Lee, author of ‘Smoke Signals’ and ‘Acid Dreams’ had to say about this issue:

“According to the federal government, specific components of the marijuana plant (THC, CBD) have medical value, but the plant itself does not have medical value. Uncle Sam’s single-molecule blinders reflect a cultural and political bias that privileges Big Pharma products. Single-molecule medicine is the predominant corporate way, the FDA-approved way, but it’s not the only way, and it’s not necessarily the optimal way to benefit from cannabis therapeutics. Cannabis contains several hundred compounds, including various flavonoids, aromatic terpenes, and many minor cannabinoids in addition to THC and CBD. Each of these compounds has specific healing attributes, but when combined they create what scientists refer to as a holistic “entourage effect,” so that the therapeutic impact of the whole plant is greater than the sum of its single-molecule parts. The Food and Drug administration, however, isn’t in the business of approving plants as medicine. [See the scientific evidence].”

Route of Administration

When looking at the effects of cannabis we need to be cognizant that different routes of cannabinoid administration have different effects. Inhaled THC enters capillaries in the lungs, passes into general circulation through the pulmonary arteries and goes directly to the brain without passing through the liver. The cannabinoids then cross the blood-brain barrier to affect the endocannabinoid receptors. In addition, when cannabis is burned new compounds are created not found in the raw or dried plant.

The respiratory route of administration allows THC and other constituents of the plant to go directly to the brain without going through the liver. THC metabolites contribute significantly to the effects of cannabis consumption. On the first pass through the liver, 85% of THC is metabolized. Some of it is metabolized to 11-hydrox-THC, a THC metabolite that activates CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain. It induces a high more potently than THC itself.

When ingested orally, however, THC and other cannabinoids and terpenes are absorbed from the small intestine over several hours. THC and the other constituents are then carried to the liver, where THC is metabolized by subclasses of cytochrome P450 enzyme (abbreviated CYP), specifically the CYP2C and CYP3A enzymes. About 85% of the THC is metabolized on its first pass through the liver. Like any oral medication, it will take about 45-75 minutes before enough of the plant constituents are in the bloodstream to exert a therapeutic effect. Further, there will be a greater effect of a THC metabolic breakdown product, 11-hydroxy-THC.

Terpenes, Cannabinoids and The Endocannabinoid System (ECS)

Let’s be very clear. All plants are chemically complex, containing hundreds of different molecules. A tomato has about 380 different molecules. Coffee 880. Cannabis 512. Of these 512 compounds, 80-100 are cannabinoids and over 125 are terpenes. Many of these chemicals have therapeutic value.

The ECS is the largest neurotransmitter system in the brain. It can be affected by both exogenous (from outside the body) and endogenous (from inside the body) cannabinoids that exert their many pharmacological effects. Dr. Raphael Mechoulam, the researcher who first isolated and identified THC in 1964, also helped characterize the ECS system in 1992.

There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors in mammalian tissues, dubbed CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB1 receptors are not only in the brain and spinal cord but in peripheral tissues as well. CB2 receptors are found primarily in immune tissues. It is quite likely that in the near future, research will identify more components of the ECS.

CBD Epilepsy

Epilepsy

In early 2014, a CNN documentary by Sanjay Gupta, M.D. pointed out the anti-epileptic properties of cannabis. He focused on a young child who had intractable seizures. Several years earlier, Dr. Mechoulam described an experiment by Paul F. Consroe and colleagues in Brazil where CBD was tested as a treatment for intractable epilepsy. Patients stayed on the anticonvulsants they had been on, which hadn’t eliminated their seizures, and added 200 mg/day of CBD or a placebo. The subjects were followed over the course of several months.

Mechoulam noted that of the seven patients getting CBD; three became seizure-free; one experienced only one or two seizures; and two experienced reduced severity and occurrence of seizures. Only one showed no improvement. CBD is one of the reasons that cannabis has been known for centuries as an anti-seizure medicine. Now in the second decade of the twenty-first century, there is increased public interest in this therapeutic property of cannabis.

As a side note, earlier this year Brazil approved the use of CBD to treat epilepsy. Prescribing is restricted to psychiatrists and neurologists.

Neuroprotective

There have been numerous studies that demonstrate cannabis’ neuroprotective capabilities. Cannabinoids help preserve brain matter in stroke and traumatic brain injury. Studies have shown that cannabidiol (CBD) at a concentration of 10 uM, was neuroprotective against both excitatory transmitter (glutamate) and oxidant (hydroperoxide) induced neurotoxicity. Mechoulam developed a synthetic cannabinoid, dextranabinol, that has been shown in basic science studies to help limit brain tissue death from decreased tissue oxygenation. This can be caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), or being placed on a heart-lung machine during cardiac bypass surgery.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Mechoulam has characterized post-traumatic stress disorder, certain phobias and forms of chronic pain as human situations which are conditioned and might be amenable to treatment with CBD.

“I know that many patients with PTSD take cannabis, self-administered,” Mechoulam said.

The Israeli Ministry of Health has tested CBD and THC at various ratios to treat PTSD. They currently have a successful program at Abarbanal Hospital in Israel where cannabis is used to treat PTSD.

Cannabinoids, Tumors and Cancer

Cannabis has been shown in both tissue culture and mice to be effective at inhibiting the growth of many cancers. CBD plays an important role in that effort. Other cannabinoids also contribute to cannabis’ anti-neoplastic (anti-cancer) effect. Cannabis is an anti-oxidant. Antioxidants have been shown to decrease the incidence of cancer. There are several mechanisms for this anti-cancer effect: cannabis affects a gene which controls metastasis so it decreases metastasis, encourages apoptosis (death of old or abnormal cells), and inhibits angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels).

In 1974, a research team at the Medical College of Virginia (acting at the behest of the federal government) discovered that cannabis inhibited malignant tumor cell growth in cell culture and in mice. This is the study that was published in the above referenced Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 1975, According to the study’s results, reported nationally in an August 18, 1974 Washing Post newspaper feature, administration of marijuana’s primary cannabinoid THC, “slowed the growth of lung cancers, breast cancers and a virus-induced leukemia in laboratory mice, and prolonged their lives by as much as 36 percent.”